Hawkes-Robinson Gamer "Floater" Theory & Thoughts on The Public's Stereotyped View of RPG Players

This started developing as a concept when I arrived in the Northwest USA in the early 2000's, and from the observations of the gamers I saw, began to take form. This has continued to develop with more clarity and observed validity in the decades of experiments since. There are number of guesses made that I don't know can ever be thoroughly put under fully empiracal testing, due to one of the premises being that the majority of the gamers are not ever visible or engaged in any of these studies, so that is problematic for developing effective testing methods. With these know short-comings, hopefully the concept inspires others to look into this further and perhaps some day get something more solid than just my observations and extrapolations.

Thoughts on RPG player stereotypes.

 published Oct 14, 2012 11:00 AM
This was in response to some of the comments at the youtube PBS Idea Channel topic on D&D, but of course the very limited 500 characters to respond was insufficient to provide much detail other than just my summarized opinion. Here I hope to elaborate a bit more regarding role-playing gamer stereotypes over the past 30+ years, and the variants I have observed...

This was in response to some of the comments at the youtube PBS Idea Channel topic on D&D, but of course the very limited 500 characters to respond was insufficient to provide much detail other than just my summarized opinion. Here I hope to elaborate a bit more regarding role-playing gamer stereotypes over the past 30+ years, and the variants I have observed...

While half of the role-playing gamers I knew from the 70's and 80's did NOT fit the stereotype, and about half did, they ranged widely in their eventual professions from becoming lawyers, computer scientists, actors, authors, bankers, etc. to newscasters, jocks (football players, basketball players, hockey players, wrestlers), various blue collar workers (mechanics, welders, plumbers, construction workers, etc), though most were generally more intelligent that average, many did not (other than enjoying RPGs) manifest other geek/nerd related attributes. Most became happy, healthy, successful contributing members of society. And though maybe falling back into the stereotype realm, when I lived and worked in Silicon Valley / Bay Area (California), there were very few of the many successful people I met and worked with there that were _not_ avid role-playing gamers either currently or in their past.

In the past decade or so it has seemed that more of the newer gamers I have met _have_ been closer to the media stereotype. I think this is because of the (artificial) stigma that has been generated over two decades, scaring off those that do not fit into the stereotype.

In the long run, I think it became a somewhat self-fulling prophecy that only “freaks and geeks” play role playing games. I suspect the alienation is purely artificially induced from individuals like Patricia Pulling (B.A.D.D. - Bothered About Dungeons & Dragons), and the pop media providing the anti-rpg extremists with a megaphone to spread their misinformation, rather than anything due to the games themselves. Since role-playing games are by their very nature strongly social cooperative activity, social alienation would be the complete opposite effects of participation in the activity. I've calling it a Gamer Floater Theory. But I'm not yet sure how to turn it into a testable specific hypothesis yet due to the nature of the theory.

I cover much more of this in detail in my analysis of the paper "Analysis of Personalities and Alienation of Dungeons and Dragons Game Players" -http://rpgr.org/documents/rpg-research-documents/older-drafts/analysis-of-personalities-and-alienation-of-dungeons-and-dragons-game-players

Your comments are welcomed.



Theory of the Role-Playing Gamer "Floater"

 published Jun 04, 2013

I have a new theory as to why the stereotypes about role-playing gamers have become stronger over the decades rather than being disproved over time (as all the research indicates). I call it a hypothesis of the "Role-playing Gamer Floater"...

My working hypothesis has two parts, one, that the now inculcated social assumption about role-playing gamers and gaming drives away more "normal" people from the hobby and attracts the stereotypes because people are increasingly buying into the media and apocryphal stories the longer they are reinforced. The second half is because the gamers that fit the stereotypes are the rejects from the regular groups.

The "mature", "normal" players are already in their groups, that typically stick together for years, even decades. Generally the make up of the group only changing when people move and such. Then there is the percentage of role-playing gamer "floaters" that get kicked from group to group because of their various dysfunctions. These are the gamers that are most often seen in public as they go to pick up games at comic book stores, hobby stores, conventions, and new-member invites. Since they are so dysfunctional, they keep getting kicked out after a few sessions, and being the cycle again.

Meanwhile the "normal" gamers are happily meeting regularly at home or in closed game rooms, and most of the public never see the "normal" players, and instead generally just see the dysfunctional floaters.

Though occasionally some of the players I gamed with in the 70's, 80's, and 90's fit the stereotypes, MOST of those I gamed with were successful, well-adjusted, functional people, with none of the anti-social and dysfunctional aspects claimed about role-playing gamer stereotypes.

The research done on role-playing gamers (correlative and meta studies) shows the stereotypes generally disproved.

Most of the gamers I gamed with regularly didn't have any more trouble getting dates, girlfriends, wives/husbands, etc. than anyone else. They were from all walks of life and interests, and over the years most of them were professionally successful.

There are very few gamers I have gamed with (once they are adults) long enough to get to know more about their personal lives, that fit the dysfunctional, anti-social, unemployed, living in their parents basement stereotype.

Though everyone has various foibles and challenges, most of them did not map to the stereotypes any more strongly than other groups (non-gamers). That being said during about that time period, more recently about half of the gamers I have met since about 2004 to current have been fitting the stereotypes. I have had to move a few times over the years when I was building my professional career, including Utah, California, Oklahoma, Idaho, Washington, and elsewhere, and as I moved it took a while to put new groups together.

When I moved to Spokane, Washington, I began seeing a LOT of the stereotypical gamers. At first I thought it might be an issue with Spokane (I haven't completely ruled that out yet), but as I have gone to Seattle and elsewhere, I developed the aforementioned alternative hypotheses.

What do you think of these ideas?

Whatever ideas I have for developing testable hypotheses run into the problem of self-selection and selection. With enough funding it is theoretically possible to find a sample of people that do not go to conventions or books stores or public gaming venues but do game with friends, through random polling and selection datagbase services like InfoCo USA. But a lot of money would be needed to find a large enough sample size to make it testable.  Once these non-prominent gamers were found, they would need to be wiling to undergo a battery of psych, demograhpics, and other assessments, and then compare and contrastd those with those in the "floater" category, vs. those just in public gaming venues and public sys, versus the general non-gaming public.  So, this could be done, but would need real money and resources to make into an actual testable hypothesis.



Mockery of Gamers

published Jan 20, 2016 11:15 AM,

In a Facebook group posting, someone stated: "I question why America sees LARPing as something to be mocked". Here is a response...

It isn't just the US, but considering the intensity to which RPGs took off in the 70s and 80s in the US, and all the media generated, it does become the most visible.

Also, I think my "Hypothesis of the Role-Playing Gamer 'Floater'" may be applicable, though I don't know how I could ever test/prove it. http://www.rpgresearch.com/blog/hypothesis-of-the-role-playing-gamer-floater

The mockery of gamers and gaming goes back (at least) decades. And LARPing, especially the popularity of "boffer" LARPs in the US are the most visible form of RPG.

A combined line from the movie "The Gamers 3: Hands of Fate": "Furries are people LARPers make fun of, LARPers are people [tabletop] gamers make fun of, and gamers are people that people make fun of." -- https://youtu.be/mFAX-_CZ2bM?list=PLwDmZhGpP6STJJfNqCdQ2IOTHaHSydmJ1&t=485

(and here is her later counter to the mocking: https://youtu.be/Wq1rfvg0h08?list=PLwDmZhGpP6STJJfNqCdQ2IOTHaHSydmJ1 

The whole stigma against gamers in all forms (including video games for a long time), has been going on since at least the 70s (and arguably even the early 1900s with H.G. Wells Wargaming book "Little Wars" - http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-22777029 ), and really peaked in the US in the mid-to-late 80s.

For some areas, it took decades for the popularity of various forms of RPGs to spread throughout other countries.

While nowhere near its previous peak in the US, it is still quite prevalent, and there are now  thoroughly inculcated myths that the general population accepts and is further fanned by popular culture (for example The Big Bang Theory: https://youtu.be/4aNUuGOUreg?t=59 ).

Here are several articles on the topics (including other countries), covering tabletop, LARP, computer-based, and related topics:

 

Here is the FB thread of the original conversation:

 https://www.facebook.com/groups/147092455420/permalink/10153646067805421/



kitsune361 says:

May 05, 2016 02:58 PM

"A combined line from the movie "The Gamers 3: Hands of Fate": "Furries are people LARPers make fun of, LARPers are people [tabletop] gamers make fun of, and gamers are people that people make fun of.""

A variation on a line that has been around forever, for every geeky outcast has relied on the adage, "at least I'm not as weird as THAT GUY." I found my original example in the 90s on the a comedy website called The Brunching Shuttlecocks, they archived it here:  http://brunching.com/images/geekchartbig.gif

I'm sure if you go back far enough you can find this kind of rhetoric as long as there has been geeky and fan communities.

Hawke Robinson says:

May 05, 2016 04:00 PM

Indeed, not just "geeky" culture, but any "other" group.


Theory of the Role-playing Gamer "Floater" Variation

published Jun 04, 2013

Originally posted Jun 04, 2013 02:35 PM: I have a new hypothesis as to why the stereotypes about role-playing gamers have become stronger over the decades rather than being disproved over time (as all the research indicates). I call it a hypothesis of the "Role-playing Gamer Floater"...

From decades of observations, my working hypothesis has two parts or possible explanations as to the observed changes I have been seeing:

#1 - That the now inculcated social assumption about role-playing gamers and gaming drives away more "normal" people from the hobby and attracts the stereotypes because people are increasingly buying into the media and apocryphal stories the longer they are reinforced.

#2 - The players that are rejected from regular, generally not public, groups, are the players constantly trying to find games at hobby stores and Pick Up Games (PUGs), because the gamers that fit the stereotypes are so dysfunctional that they are the rejects from the regular groups, and because they keep getting kicked out, become the most visible representation of gamers to the public.

 

The functional players are already in their groups, that typically stick together for years, even decades. Generally the make up of the group only changing when people move and such.

Then there is the percentage of dysfunctional role-playing gamer "floaters" that get kicked from group to group because of their various dysfunctions. These are the gamers that are most often seen in public as they go to pick up games at comic book stores, hobby stores, conventions, and new-member invites. Since they are so dysfunctional, they keep getting kicked out after a few sessions, and being the cycle again.

Meanwhile the functional gamers are happily meeting regularly at home or in closed game rooms, and most of the public never see the "normal" players, and instead generally just see the dysfunctional floaters.

Though occasionally some of the players I gamed with in the 70's, 80's, and 90's fit the negative stereotypes, MOST of those I gamed with were successful, well-adjusted, functional people,from a broad range of "group association", with generally little to none of the anti-social and dysfunctional aspects claimed about role-playing gamer stereotypes.

The research done on role-playing gamers (correlative and meta studies) shows the stereotypes in the 1980s and 1990s generally disproved. I haven't seen any updated studies in the 2000s (most have been focusing on video games now).

Most of the gamers I gamed with regularly long ago, didn't have any more trouble getting dates, girlfriends, wives/husbands, etc. than anyone else. They were from all walks of life and interests, and over the years most of them were professionally and personally "successful", within the context of functional versus "dysfunctional" western societal expectations.

There are very few gamers I have gamed with (once they are adults) long enough to get to know more about their personal lives, that fit the dysfunctional, anti-social, unemployed, living in their parents basement stereotype.

Though everyone has various foibles and challenges, most of them did not map to the stereotypes any more strongly than other groups (non-gamers). That being said during about that time period (70s, 80s, and 90s), more recently about half of the gamers I have met since about 2004 (when I moved to Spokane, Washington) to current, have been fitting the stereotypes. Socially awkward to dysfunctional, poor hygiene/stinky, borderline homeless or living in their parent's home in their 30s, 40s+, etc.

I have had to move a few times over the years when I was building my professional career in computer science (before retiring in 2003 to raise my family full time), including Utah, California, Oklahoma, Idaho, Washington, and elsewhere, and as I moved it took a while to put new groups together. I didn't game much in the late 90's to earliest 2000s due to working so much, but when I did, I didn't really see an increase in the negative stereotypes.

Then when I moved to Spokane, Washington, in 2004, I began seeing a LOT of the stereotypical gamers. At first I thought it might be an issue with Spokane (I haven't completely ruled that out yet), but as I have gone to Seattle and elsewhere, I developed the aforementioned alternative hypotheses, as I saw similar patterns elsewhere.

What are your thoughts on this?

 

UPDATE 2016: Over the past 5 years, I have begun to try taking more semi-formal observational notes, observing from a distance rather than directly interacting, at game stores, gatherings, and conventions. I have observed more than 1,000 so far, and while the ratio at this more purely observational level isn't as high, it is still disturbing in number. The key factors I watch for include:

  • Special needs individuals harassment, teasing, bias & exclusion
  • Sexual harassment, bias, exclusion, inconsiderate and hurtful language
  • Extreme lack of hygiene
  • Very noticeably disruptive behavior at the table
  • Non-in-game yelling at players/GM that is clearly upsetting by facial/body language of the others
  • Storming off from the table or physical lashing out

With those much more limited criteria, in Spokane it has been around 1-2 players per table per session! Some tables are a majority behaving this way, others have none.

In Seattle (smaller sample size so far, only about 400), it seems about 1 player per 2 to 3 tables per session.

This doesn't even take into account so many other stereotypes and dysfunctions that could come up with interaction and interview, this is just what an outsider would see, that would further reinforce the negative stereotypes about tabletop gamers.

What do you, the reader, think?

Whatever ideas I have for developing testable hypotheses run into the problem of self-selection and selection and of course research resources. With enough funding it is theoretically possible to find a sample of people that do not go to conventions or books stores or public gaming venues but do game with friends, through random polling and selection datagbase services like InfoCo USA. But a lot of money would be needed to find a large enough sample size to make it testable.  Once these non-prominent gamers were found, they would need to be wiling to undergo a battery of psych, demograhpics, and other assessments, and then compare and contrastd those with those in the "floater" category, vs. those just in public gaming venues and public sys, versus the general non-gaming public.  So, this could be done, but would need real money and resources to make into an actual testable hypothesis:


Harassment and Worse in RPG Industry & Community

A blog article was posted to the CAR-PGA (The Committee for the Advancement of Role-Playing Games) mailing list today, regarding terrible behavior by the RPG industry & Community...

Below is the message that was sent to the Car-PGA (The Committee for the Advancement of Role-Playing Games) mailing list. Regarding sexual harassment in the tabletop RPG industry & community. - http://latining.tumblr.com/post/141567276944/tabletop-gaming-has-a-white-male-terrorism-problem


While I have read the blog posting, I haven't researched it any further yet so I do not know more about validity of the source yet, but it was the occasional stories like these, for various orientations, ethnicities, disabilities, and other populations, told to me verbally as I was performing other RPG research, that lead to my starting research specifically on this topic years ago, which is currently undergoing analysis, to have some idea of prevalence as updated here: http://rpgresearch.com/blog/rpg-gender-bias-research-stage-2-status-update-1


This is also why I have been trying to build the RPG Trailer (http://gofundme.com/rpgtrailer) to provide a "safer" gaming environment, though most people have not understood what I meant by this (an unfortunate failure of communication on my part). Hopefully this article makes that clearer.


Much more needs to be done to fix the PUG (Pick-Up Gamer) environment at hobby stores, conventions, etc. See my points on the "Gamer Floater Hypothesis" for the long list of relevant issues: http://rpgresearch.com/blog/hypothesis-of-the-role-playing-gamer-floater While these dysfunctional players need help, and I believe a properly implemented gaming environment can help them, I believe they are driving away a much broader potential audience, and we as a community, industry, and PUG hosts, need to do more to address these issues.


The Car-PGA Email:
### BEING EMAIL ###
" A very long piece on sexual harassment in the tabletop community has been
brought to my attention:
http://latining.tumblr.com/post/141567276944/tabletop-gaming-has-a-white-male-terrorism-problem
Please note that there is an opportunity for direct action in the case of Wyrd;
their phone number and online contact form are at the bottom of the post.

CAR-PGa has a longstanding interest in increasing the number of women in
gaming and opposing all forms of harassment. Suggestions on new initiatives
to combat this problem are welcome.

CAR-PGa publishs one of if not *the* most complete gaming convention
schedules, and I'd be really interested in getting some volunteers to find
out which meet the Scalzi minimum-acceptable-harassment-policies (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2013/07/02/my-new-convention-harassment-policy/).
An example of an acceptable harassment policy would be, for example, that
of the American Library Association's conferences (http://2016.alaannual.org/statement-appropriate-conduct).

Finally, while the subject does not normally come up, allow me to state for
the record that neither the Newsletter nor this discussion list will
tolerate attempts to harass people via them. —Alan"
### END OF EMAIL ###

 

UPDATE 20160403: Someone posted the following response: The person who posted the blog did get her Day in Court and did win: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/taking-a-stand-against-abuse-284204591.html



Mother to child: "Those kinds of people kill people"

(talking about role-playing gamers) March 15th, 2019.


Variations of this happen so often that I generally don't bother posting about it anymore. Typically anywhere from once per month to once per week, I encounter something in the ballpark of these negative attitudes about role-playing gamers/gaming from the inculcated myths. But this past Friday was exceptional, with 3 separate families forbidding their children!

Children: "Mom, why can't we play that game?" Mother: "We don't play those kinds of games. Those people who play those games kill people!".

Not a month goes by that I don't personally run into someone expressing some kind of anti-gamer/gaming attitude in some variation, if not weekly. Our other volunteer staff run into it across the USA and in other countries.

It has been so commonplace, I stopped bothering to mention each instance anymore. But 3 times in just a few hours was quite exceptional that day!

I personally ran into this recently across our 8 western states  RPG Tour, plus when briefly in Colorado and Philladelphia since September 2018.

We've been operating as RPG Research since 2004, but I've been involved with RPGs since 1977, and RPG research since 1983, running RPGs in classrooms since 1985, and in therapeutic settings since 2004.

Prior to about 1982 it wasn't an issue (see the movie E.T.), then from about '82 onward the anti-gamer/gaming attitudes began to spread. They aren't as bad as the 80s and 90s, but still very prevalent.

This is also very much prevalent in professional circles, not just laypeople. All of our presentations in professional nongeek/gamer settings require debunking the myths first, else progress will not be made.  Just a few years ago the head of the therapeutic recreation (TR) department at a state psychiatric institute, (more than a dozen TR staff) who at least was willing to have an initial conversation at a professional gathering, cut me off in mid-research-statements stating "Over my dead body will I allow RPGs in our facility", as he then turned on his heel and left.  Fortunately his younger staffers said, "just wait, he'll be retiring soon, and we'd like to talk then."

I run into this in a wide range of locations, populations, and circumstances.

I have run into the negative legacy of B.A.D.D., the Pat Robertson 700 Club, local congregational leadership, and the moral/satanic panic of the 80s even in 2010-2019 anywhere from California to Chicago, Atlanta to Arizona to Washington, and in between. Also our staff has run into it in Canada, England, France, & Belgium, just to name a few.

See the list of additional examples linked at the end of this article.

What was exceptional this time was that it happened three different times, in variation, with 2 other families, for a total of 3 separate families all within a couple of hours!

Those other 2 sets of parents were also either verbally or literally dragging their kids away, not willing to let us have a conversation. 3 different families in one day was much higher than usual by far, and thus this article bringing it up more publicly, since it was especially bad that day.

All 3 families were around at different times, the two other families' kids were at the door in the hallway, watching, wanting to play, but their parents said no, and eventually made them leave with similar, though not quite as severe, admonishments as the first family.

All this was just this past Friday, March 15th, 2019, as we were setting up at the Deer Park Spokane County (Eastern Washington, USA) public county library for our weekly tabletop Drop In and RPG community outreach programs.

We were there from 3:30 pm to just after 7:00 pm, but most of the "action" took place between 3:45 pm to 6:00 pm.

Fortunately we were able to get a 4th family to overcome their fears and give it a shot. And had great turnaround in their attitude. They were greatly pleased to see 3 of the family of 7 kids, working cooperatively, not squabbling, around ages 4 to 9, playing No Thank You Evil.

Running into anti-gamer/gaming comments and attitudes once per month/week is pretty average. Usually it is as they walk past, or they are intentionally talking very "passive-agressively" with overtly loud statements to each other or the interested kids, making their beliefs clear to us, but not willing to provide a chance to speak with us or even take a brochure or card.

We usually turn it around if they are willing to speak with us, but some people won't even let us have a conversation with them. Fortunately there are usually more families that had similar concerns but are willing to have a conversation, and let their kids try the game, and watched, learned, and changed their minds. Those that do, usually will try it, and we turn it around. between our research brochures, and their seeing what the game actually is, rather than their inculcated misconceptions of what an RPG is about.

We run these RPG outrearch programs dubbed "Drop In and RPG" at different public locations each Friday (and soon adding weekends).

http://DropInAndRpg.com This is why we keep doing the weekly outreach at so many locations outside of the "gamer and geekdom bubble".

These terribly inculcated beliefs are a big part of why the outreach programs are so important.

Now, obviously, I'm bringing it up very visibly with what we do, and the very obvious artwork and large vehicles advertising the games, see the http://rpgbus.com and http://rpgtrailer.com , so of course we're going to have more overt engagement from folks, but that is part of the point, so that we can take this on to raise awareness, and educate the ignorance out of folks. It is a challenge, but it is definitely working.

This is why we open most of our presentations with shooting down the myths first, and then building up from there. As per this article on "Why 'waste' so much time on the past?". This is why.

 

We hope more people around the world will consider doing the same.

Happy & health gaming!

FYI, helpful resource for anyone else running into Christians concerned about RPGs, The Christian Gamers Guild: http://www2.rpgresearch.com/documents/primary/list/archives/christian-gamers-guild-faq-frequently-asked-questions-by-christians-about-role-playing-games

Addendum

RPG Research is a 501(c)3 non-profit charitable research and human services organization with over 50 volunteer staff members, about half in our region, the rest across several continents.

Fortunately there are a lot of resources and persuasive arguments available when we have these encounters, including the the Christian Gamers Guild and others.

We have quite a few Christians in our staff. Some that had actually stopped playing in the 80s due to the panic, but are now back and advocating.

As long as people let us have a conversation, our success rate is very high.

We have overwhelming research evidence, and for those that don't care about research, we have the aforementioned resources.

Also we use a lot more than just D&D: Dr Who, The One Ring RPG, No Thank You Evil, etc.

We do have a couple of Christian members who literally promised at each of their parent's death bed not to play D&D, and have followed that literally, but now do play other RPGs as long as not D&D-based, as a work around.

As Requested, Additional Examples

Papers/Presentations on Academia.edu / Researchgate.net / etc.

Self-Deception & Propaganda Against Role-Playing Gamers by B.A.D.D. and Others (Psychology of Deception Paper). https://www.academia.edu/42079329/Deception_Term_Paper_Hawkes_Robinson_20140315i_Rev_20140922j

Why "waste" so much time discussing the RPG past?https://www.academia.edu/38362118/Hawkes-Robinson-RPG-Research-Why-Waste-Time-Discussing-RPG-Past-20190130b.pdf

The Defamation of Role-Playing Games & Gamers, Conflict & Barriers to Interpersonal Effectiveness, Addressing Inculcated Stereotypes & Prejudice: https://www.academia.edu/42079278/The_Defamation_of_Role-Playing_Games_and_Gamers_Conflict_and_Barriers_to_Interpersonal_Effectiveness_Addressing_Inculcated_Stereotypes_and_Prejudice

Personalities and Alienation of Dungeons and Dragons Game Players: https://www.academia.edu/3668973/RPGR-A005_Personalities_and_Alienation_of_Dungeons_and_Dragons_Game_Players_long_commentary

The Battle Over Role Playing Gaming - Other Minds Magazine: https://www.academia.edu/23445532/The_Battle_Over_Role_Playing_Gaming_-_Other_Minds_Magazine_Submission

Blog/Articles:

Why the Popular Negative Stereotypes About Role-playing Gamers is Important To Address - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/blog/why-the-popular-negative-stereotypes-about-role-playing-gamers-is-important-to-address

Yet Another Example of Inculcated Stigma Regarding Role-Playing Gamers: http://www2.rpgresearch.com/blog/yet-another-example-of-inculcated-stigma-regarding-role-playing-gamers

The Defamation of Role-Playing Gaming and Gamers  http://www2.rpgresearch.com/documents/rpg-research-project/archives/the-defamation-of-role-playing-gaming-and-gamers

Mockery of Gamers - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/blog/mockery-of-gamers

Gamer Floater Theory 1 - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/blog/hypothesis-of-the-role-playing-gamer-floater-1

Gamer Floater Theory variant - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/blog/hypothesis-of-the-role-playing-gamer-floater

Presentation on Conflict and Barriers to Interpersonal Effectiveness Addressing Inculcated Stereotyping and Prejudice Toward RPG - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/blog/presention-on-conflict-and-barriers-to-interpersonal-effectiveness-addressing-inculcated-stereotyping-and-prejudice-toward-rpg

PDF of the above - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/documents/rpg-research-project/archives/pdf/rpgr-a0013a1-inculcated-stereotyping-and-prejudice-about-rpg-2014-rev-e.pdf/view

Short list of the Typical Inculcated Concepts About Role-Playing Games and Gamers -  http://www2.rpgresearch.com/documents/rpg-research-project/faqs/what-are-the-typical-inculcated-concepts-about-role-playing-games-and-gamers

RPG Paper The Stigmas and Benefits - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/documents/primary/reference-material/to-be-sorted/rpgpaper-the-stigmas-and-benefits.htm

Dungeons & Dragons and Other Fantasy Role-Playing Games - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/documents/primary/list/archives/dungeons-and-dragonstm-and-other-fantasy-role-playing-games

Big Bang Theory Examples of Inculcated Gamer Stereotypes in Current Years - http://www2.rpgresearch.com/documents/primary/reference-material/to-be-sorted/04-big-bang-theory-examples-of-inculcated-gamer.mp4/view

Videos & Video Comments

Ongoing Christian Stigma against RPGs & RPGers, Youtube & ongoing Comments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4XAtqaNNK8

2020 Example of inculcated myths & attitudes at Starbucks in Seattle/Millcreek: https://www.instagram.com/p/B6_PkIEBtxP/

Comments from Other Sources to this Article

Facebook 20190324: https://www.facebook.com/groups/roleplaytheorystudygroup/2204615582915642/?comment_id=2215602795150254&notif_id=1553492029204672&notif_t=group_comment&ref=notif

Silveira Rodrigo: Sad to hear that, I thought this kind of crap I would have less when i move overseas, but seems the problem is worldwide :/
 
Back in the 90's, the RPG scene in my country was growing fast, we had events with public and private sponsoring, had events on public streets, public buildings. Then around 2000 we had a murder case here than initially was tied to RPGs because they found in the bedroom of the victim some Vampire The Masquerade books and police thought it was some kind of cult.
That case damaged deeply the scene, no brand would want to sponsor events or would want to see their names tied to RPGs. This affected the whole country, but specially my state, where the crime happened. It was all bs based on lazy police work, later they would find the real guilty, nothing to do with RGPs, but by them the RPG reputation was already ruined by the media.
Recently I organized an event aimed to show teachers show to use RPGs to Empowerment and protagonism of Black people, I choose a community school that works with low income students, school ran by a religious organization, I thought would be positive and help to demystify the RPG. When I went to present the project, they bought up the subject of the crime, I explained what really happened and the positive aspects of RPGs. They loved and were even enthusiastic when I explained the uses of the hobby besides being "just a game" and approved I used the place for the event.
After that initial meeting tho, I found so many people asked "isnt that murder game where people die if loose it?" to the school administration that even tho they didnt cancel the event, they made no effort to let the students and teachers to know about it, to avoid connect the hobby with the institution, affecting the attendance, as my target audience was the people in the school.
I was very disappointed to see that case still haunting me so many years later, I can see we will carry this stigma for a long time, and I don't know how our future will be, since religious conservative mindset is growing here and we have them in mass in the government, I wouldn't be surprised if the "murder game" get in the shooting line.



Mar 18, 2019 11:54 AM
Addendum: We are volunteers over staff of 55 with about half in our region, the rest across several continents. Fortunately there are a lot of resources and persuasive arguments available, including the the Christian Gamers Guild and others, and we have quite a few Christians in our staff. Some that had stopped playing in the 80s due to the panic, but are now back and advocating. As long as they let us have a conversation our success rate is very good. We have overwhelming research evidence, and for those that don't care about that, we have the aforementioned resources. Also we use a lot more than D&D: Dr Who, The One Ring RPG, No Thank You Evil, etc. We do have a couple of Christian staff members who literally promised at each of their parent's death bed not to play D&D, but have followed that literally, and now do play other RPGs as long as not D&D-based as a work around to keeping their literal word.